LINGUISTIC ACCOMPANIMENT OF INFORMATION WARFARE (BASED ON THE RUSSIAN-UKRAINIAN ARMED CONFLICT)

Keywords: armed aggression, associative-semantic field, associative-semantic modelling, constituents, associations, reflexemes

Abstract

Language is an important means of waging an information war. The study of linguistic units, through which each of the parties to the armed conflict affects the recipients, makes it possible to model a fragment of the language picture of the world of society forced to live in war. Often this picture is formed under the influence of the mass media and social networks. In this paper, the associative-semantic field “enemy” in the context of the Russian-Ukrainian armed confrontation is structured on the basis of the language units used by Ukrainian information resources. Particular attention is paid to the peculiarities of the associative-semantic group (ASG) “enemy media”, which include three microgroups (ASmG) with core lexemes “mass media”, “journalists”, “phenomena”. The constituents of ASmG “mass media” are divided into semantic rows: associations that reveal the Russian affiliation of information resources (Russia- media, Putin-TV); lexemes that indicate the propagandistic nature of the media (information Spetsnaz); lexemes to denote the harmfulness of actions (to sow confusion, to lie through one’s teeth). The components of ASmG “journalists” are lexemes that indicate the privilege of individual employees of the media industry (generals of information troops) and their financial interest (millionaires from TV). ASmG “phenomena” combines terms formed from the names of famous journalists (Kyselov – kyselovshchyna, Skabeieva – skabeievshchyna), as well as phraseological units that appeared as a result of the Russian media spreading false or manipulative information (crucified boy, into radioactive ash).

References

1. Devlin, Anne Marie. (2017). Lard-eaters, gay-ropeans, sheeple and prepositions: lexical and syntactic devices employed to position the other in Russian online political forums. Russian Journal of Communication, 9(1), 53–70. doi: 10.1080/19409419.2016.1219642
2. Fabiszak, M. A. (2007). Conceptual Metaphor approach to war discourse and its implications. Poznań: Wydawnictwo Naukowe UAM.
3. Fialkova, L., Yelenevskaya, M. (2015). The crisis in Ukraine and the split of identity in the Rus¬sian-speaking world. Folklorica, Vol. XIX. doi: 10.17161/folklorica.v19i1.5721
4. Goriacheva, D. (2016). Understanding the “Ukrainian crisis.” Metaphors used by Ukrainian, German, and British leaders in 2014–16. Ideology and Politics, 1(6), 86–152. [in Ukrainian]
5. Korotych, K. V. (2007). Asotsiatyvno-semantychne pole “bezpeka / nebezpeka” v dyskursi ukrainskoi presy XX–XXI stolit [Associative-semantic field «safety / danger» in Ukrainian press discourse of XX–XXI centuries] Avtoref. dys. kand. filol. nauk [PhD’s thesis abstract]. Kharkivskyi natsionalnyi universytet imeni V.N. Karazina, Kharkiv. [in Ukrainian]
6. Krongauz, M. (2013). Russkij na grani sry’va (interv’yu s direktorom Instituta lingvistiki RGGU M.Krongauzom) [Russian on the verge of collapse (interview with M. Krongauz, director of the Institute of Linguistics of the Russian State University for the Humanities)]. Rossijskaya Gazeta, 19 (5995). https://rg.ru/2013/01/31/yazyk.html [in Russian]
7. Kyryliuk, O.L. (2019). Asotsiatyvno-semantychne pole «viina» v suspilno-politychnomu dys¬kursi [Associative-semantic field “war” in socio-political discourse]. Svit Movy – Svit u Movi: Proceedings of the V-th International conference, Kyiv, 74–77. [in Ukrainian]
8. Kyryliuk, O.L. (2020). Struktura asotsiatyvno-semantychnoho polia “voroh” v dyskursi infor¬matsiinoi viiny [Structure of the associative-semantic field “enemy” in the discourse of the information war]. Aktualni Pytannia Humanitarnykh Nauk, 29(2), 53–58. [in Ukrainian]
9. Lakoff, G. (1992). Metaphor and war: The metaphor system used to justify war in the gulf. Journal of Cognitive Semiotics, IV(2), 5–19.
10. Parakhonskyi, B., Yavorska, H. (2019). Ontolohiia viiny i myru: bezpeka, stratehiia, smysl [Ontology of war and peace: security, strategy, meaning]. Kyiv: NISD. [in Ukrainian]
11. Pochepczov, G. (2019). Kognitivny’e vojny’ v soczmedia, massovoj kul’ture i massovy’x kom-munikaciyax [Cognitive wars in social media, mass culture and mass communications.]. Khar¬kov: Folio. [in Russian]
12. Smoor, L. (2017). Understanding the narratives explaining the Ukrainian crisis: identity divi¬sions and complex diversity in Ukraine. Acta Universitatis Sapientiae, European and Regional Studies, 11(1), 63–96. https://doi.org/10.1515/auseur-2017-0004
13. Strukov, V., Hudspith, S. (2018). Russian culture in the age of globalization. New York: Routledge.
14. Yavorska, H. (2016). Mova yak skladnyk konfliktu [Language as a component of conflict]. Media Studies: Mezhdisciplinarny’e Issledovaniya Media, 103–108. [in Ukrainian]

Abstract views: 16
PDF Downloads: 14
Published
2021-02-08
How to Cite
Kyryliuk, O. (2021). LINGUISTIC ACCOMPANIMENT OF INFORMATION WARFARE (BASED ON THE RUSSIAN-UKRAINIAN ARMED CONFLICT). Scientific Journal of Polonia University, 39(2), 82-89. https://doi.org/10.23856/3910
Section
LANGUAGE, CULTURE, COMMUNICATION